Postponed Presentation: “Small but Elegant — Frank Lloyd Wright’s Affordable Homes”

Image Courtesy: The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

As soon as we moved into the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Elizabeth Murphy House, we began unearthing lost clues explaining Wright’s evolving ideas about the wants and needs of common folks (like us). We will share experiences through stories and photos at this Sunday Morning Forum.

Wait. There was no such thing as a “Ranch” home in 1918

Wright was thinking - forty years before anyone else - of lush walkable neighborhoods featuring long, low affordable homes with shadowy eaves, banks of windows, grassy yards and built-in gardens.

Tracking the restoration and preservation of a 102-year-old Frank Lloyd Wright house

A current project inventory and links to posts and images.

Learn more about the tiny Frank Lloyd Wright house in Shorewood, Wisconsin

Neighbors, friends and the historically curious are invited to attend a presentation - chock full of photographs, tales of stewardship and mysterious backstories - about the historic Elizabeth Murphy House, the only Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home in Shorewood, Wisconsin.

Preserving Shorewood’s Rich History

Stewardship is not a product of special oversight placed on historic homes. It comes, instead, from a shared commitment to storytelling, passed between generations.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Elizabeth Murphy House to be featured in 2019 OSHER presentation

Learn more about The Elizabeth Murphy House and its place in Frank Lloyd Wright's work and legacy, by attending a presentation on Friday, 6/14/2019 at 12:30pm at the Hefter Center at UWM.

The System within the System

Citing a vast body of drawings and plans, historians have called the ASBH project the largest single design effort by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Beauty in an imperfect system

Underneath magnificent art lie the trials, troubles and lessons-learned by the artist.

Compress, release, repeat.

By creating a deliberately small space through which one must pass before reaching a larger space, Frank Lloyd Wright caused a temporary sense of tension, followed by a powerful feeling of freedom.